Conserve Radiant heating

Radiant heating systems supply heat directly to the floor or to panels in the wall or ceiling of your home.

Underfloor heating is a well known version of radiant heating and this can be used with either a wet (hot water) or dry (electric) heating system. This system can be provided by either a heated mat or coiled hot water pipes which are placed under the floor covering. Underfloor heating can operate at a lower temperature than conventional radiators so this makes it more fuel efficient.

Radiant heating illustration

Radiant wall or ceiling heating panels are usually made of aluminium and are heated by electricity or hot water. They have the quickest response time of any heating technology and the panels can be controlled individually for each room so use less fuel than a conventional system.

  • Radiant heating Advantages

  • Radiant heating can operate at a lower temperature thus saving money.
  • Radiant floor systems allow even heating throughout the whole floor, not just in localized spots as with wood stoves, hot air systems, and other types of radiators.
  • Does not produce any allergens, so is better for people that suffer with allergies.
  • Wall and ceiling panels have the quickest response time of any heating technology.
  • The panels can be controlled individually for each room.
  • There are no radiators needed so it is easier to furnish rooms.
  • Radiant heating Disadvantages

  • Radiant floor heating can require a large investment to install.
  • Radiant floor heating is more suited to new builds and renovations rather than retrofitting as it requires all the floors to be relaid with either heating mats or pipes.
  • Radiant heating requires professional installers.

Available with

You can get grants for Radiant heating, below are the schemes this is available with.

* According to data sourced from the Energy Saving Trust website.